Which probiotic is right for me quiz?

Probiotics are beneficial microbes that support the health of the intestinal flora, that is, the microbiome. Find out which probiotic formula is right for you.

Which probiotic is right for me quiz?

Probiotics are beneficial microbes that support the health of the intestinal flora, that is, the microbiome. Find out which probiotic formula is right for you. Luckily, you don't have to guess. We have a quiz to help you get on the right track.

When you're looking for a probiotic, there are plenty of products to choose from. You'll find many brands with different ingredients and everything from pills to powders and liquids. Take a few minutes to learn how to navigate the options and you'll be rewarded with the right probiotic to improve your health. Probiotics are “good bacteria”, just like good bacteria found in the gut.

You may also hear that they are known as “live cultures” (for example, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli). They can help boost immunity and improve digestion by protecting the gut from “bad bacteria”. Our bodies naturally contain “good bacteria”, so adding probiotics means adding more of these good bacteria. While more research is needed to fully understand the benefits of different probiotic strains, we know that not all probiotics are created equal.

Lactobacilli, for example, live in our digestive, urinary and genital systems and can be found in some fermented foods such as yogurt. Bifidobacteria normally live in the intestines as lactic acid bacteria and are also found in fermented foods. And whether you use SBO Probiotics or not, I'm deeply committed to helping you start thinking about gut health in a whole new way. Products that contain prebiotics and probiotics are called synbiotics because they contain both the live bacteria and the fuel needed to thrive.

You'll find natural probiotics in fermented milk products, such as yogurt, kefir, and aged cheeses. Although starting low levels may help you better tolerate the probiotic, increasing the dose may be important to achieve the desired effects. The results of research on probiotics and IBS show that 14% of patients with IBS experience improvement in symptoms by including probiotics. This number is not very high or encouraging for someone with IBS looking for relief, however, it is worth trying to add probiotics.

A general recommendation is to choose probiotic products with at least one billion colony-forming units and containing the genera Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium or Saccharomyces boulardii, some of the most researched probiotics. There are many studies examining the effect of probiotics, mainly lactic acid bacteria, also known as lactobacilli, on diarrhea. To be a true probiotic, a product must contain live and active bacterial cultures, and it must be indicated on its packaging. However, the weight change in those taking probiotics compared to placebo (fake pills) was slight: a few kilos.

The myriad of probiotic products on the market contain an even wider range of probiotic bacterial strains. This is important because when scientists investigate how well probiotics work for a health condition, they use very specific types. The gut environment (also known as gut flora) in some people with IBS has changed, so it seems logical to study how probiotics can help. Probiotics are especially useful after a round of antibiotics, since these drugs kill both infectious and healthy bacteria.

The Shirota strain of Casei led to an increase in probiotics lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, as well as a significant decrease in symptoms of anxiety and depression.

Amie Fitser
Amie Fitser

Incurable pop culture guru. Typical bacon ninja. Freelance internet scholar. Professional social media scholar. Hardcore gamer.

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